List of Hot Country Singles number ones of 1967

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A blonde woman wearing a dark blouse with polka dots, smiling slightly
A black-haired woman in a dark blue outfit with white polka dots, looking contemplative while sitting at a table
Two of country music's most successful female vocalists, Tammy Wynette (left) and Loretta Lynn, both reached number one for the first time in 1967.

Hot Country Songs is a chart that ranks the top-performing country music songs in the United States, published by Billboard magazine. In 1967, 23 different singles topped the chart, then published under the title Hot Country Singles, in 52 issues of the magazine, based on playlists submitted by country music radio stations and sales reports submitted by stores.[1]

At the start of the year the number one position was held by Jack Greene with "There Goes My Everything", which had been in the top spot since the issue of Billboard dated December 24, 1966.[2] The song remained at the top of the chart for a further five weeks in 1967 before it was replaced by Loretta Lynn's "Don't Come Home A' Drinkin' (With Lovin' On Your Mind)" in the issue dated February 11. The song marked the first appearance at number one for Lynn,[3] whose career would ultimately span six decades and lead to her being regarded as one of the most influential artists in country music.[4][5] Another female vocalist who would go on to achieve a string of number one hits and be viewed as an all-time great of country music, Tammy Wynette, also reached number one for the first time in 1967. Wynette topped the chart for the first time when she collaborated with David Houston on the song "My Elusive Dreams",[6] and returned to the top spot later in the year with the solo single "I Don't Wanna Play House". As a result of their lengthy and successful careers, both Lynn and Wynette would be dubbed the "first lady of country".[5][7]

Three other artists topped the chart for the first time in 1967: Wynn Stewart, who topped the chart for two weeks in June with "It's Such a Pretty World Today",[8] Leon Ashley, who spent a single week in the top spot in September with "Laura (What's He Got That I Ain't Got)",[9] and Jan Howard, who ended the year at number one with "For Loving You", a duet with Bill Anderson.[10] Sonny James spent the highest number of total weeks at number one in 1967, occupying the top spot for eleven weeks with "Need You", "I'll Never Find Another You" and "It's the Little Things", one week more than Jack Greene spent at number one with "There Goes my Everything" and "All the Time". In addition to James, three other artists took three different singles to number one in 1967: David Houston, who topped the chart with "With One Exception" and "You Mean the World to Me" as well as his duet with Tammy Wynette, and Buck Owens, who reached the top spot with "Where Does the Good Times Go", "Sam's Place" and "Your Tender Loving Care".

Chart history[edit]

A black-haired man with a neutral expression
Sonny James spent the most weeks at number one of any artist in 1967.
A dark-haired woman wearing a white jacket and pants, standing on a stage
Jan Howard (pictured in 2007) ended the year at number one with "For Loving You", a duet with Bill Anderson.
A dark-haired man wearing a check shirt
Wynn Stewart had his only chart-topper in 1967.
Issue date Title Artist(s) Ref.
January 7 "There Goes My Everything" Jack Greene [11]
January 14 [12]
January 21 [13]
January 28 [14]
February 4 [15]
February 11 "Don't Come Home A' Drinkin' (With Lovin' On Your Mind)" Loretta Lynn [16]
February 18 "Where Does the Good Times Go" Buck Owens [17]
February 25 [18]
March 4 "I'm A Lonesome Fugitive" Merle Haggard [19]
March 11 "Where Does the Good Times Go" Buck Owens [20]
March 18 [21]
March 25 "I Won't Come In While He's There" Jim Reeves [22]
April 1 "Walk Through This World With Me" George Jones [23]
April 8 [24]
April 15 "Lonely Again" Eddy Arnold [25]
April 22 [26]
April 29 "Need You" Sonny James [27]
May 6 [28]
May 13 "Sam's Place" Buck Owens [29]
May 20 [30]
May 27 [31]
June 3 "It's Such a Pretty World Today" Wynn Stewart [32]
June 10 [33]
June 17 "All The Time" Jack Greene [34]
June 24 [35]
July 1 [36]
July 8 [37]
July 15 [38]
July 22 "With One Exception" David Houston [39]
July 29 "Tonight Carmen" Marty Robbins [40]
August 5 "I'll Never Find Another You" Sonny James [41]
August 12 [42]
August 19 [43]
August 26 [44]
September 2 "Branded Man" Merle Haggard [45]
September 9 "Your Tender Loving Care" Buck Owens [46]
September 16 "My Elusive Dreams" David Houston and Tammy Wynette [47]
September 23 [48]
September 30 "Laura (What's He Got That I Ain't Got)" Leon Ashley [49]
October 7 "Turn The World Around" Eddy Arnold [50]
October 14 "I Don't Wanna Play House" Tammy Wynette [51]
October 21 [52]
October 28 [53]
November 4 "You Mean the World to Me" David Houston [54]
November 11 [55]
November 18 "It's the Little Things" Sonny James [56]
November 25 [57]
December 2 [58]
December 9 [59]
December 16 [60]
December 23 "For Loving You" Bill Anderson and Jan Howard [61]
December 30 [62]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2005). Joel Whitburn's Top Country Songs: 1944-2005. Record Research. p. ix. ISBN 9780898201659.
  2. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for December 24, 1966". Billboard. Retrieved May 24, 2018.
  3. ^ Betts, Stephen L. (February 14, 2017). "Flashback: Loretta Lynn Scores With Cautionary 'Don't Come Home'". Rolling Stone. Retrieved May 24, 2018.
  4. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Loretta Lynn Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved May 24, 2018.
  5. ^ a b "The 60 greatest female singer-songwriters of all time". The Daily Telegraph. March 8, 2018. Retrieved May 24, 2018.
  6. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Tammy Wynette Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved May 24, 2018.
  7. ^ "'First lady of country' Wynette is dead at 55". Variety. April 7, 1998. Retrieved May 24, 2018.
  8. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Wynn Stewart Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved May 24, 2018.
  9. ^ "Leon Ashley Chart History". Billboard. Retrieved May 24, 2018.
  10. ^ Brennan, Sandra. "Jan Howard Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved May 24, 2018.
  11. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for January 7, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  12. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for January 14, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  13. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for January 21, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  14. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for January 28, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  15. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for February 4, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  16. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for February 11, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  17. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for February 18, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  18. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for February 25, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  19. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for March 4, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  20. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for March 11, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  21. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for March 18, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  22. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for March 25, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  23. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for April 1, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  24. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for April 8, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  25. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for April 15, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  26. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for April 22, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  27. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for April 29, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  28. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for May 6, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  29. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for May 13, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  30. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for May 20, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  31. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for May 27, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  32. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for June 3, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  33. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for June 10, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  34. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for June 17, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  35. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for June 24, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  36. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for July 1, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  37. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for July 8, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  38. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for July 15, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  39. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for July 22, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  40. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for July 29, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  41. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for August 5, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  42. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for August 12, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  43. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for August 19, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  44. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for August 26, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  45. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for September 2, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  46. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for September 9, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  47. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for September 16, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  48. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for September 23, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  49. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for September 30, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  50. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for October 7, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  51. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for October 14, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  52. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for October 21, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  53. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for October 28, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  54. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for November 4, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  55. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for November 11, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  56. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for November 18, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  57. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for November 25, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  58. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for December 2, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  59. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for December 9, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  60. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for December 16, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  61. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for December 23, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  62. ^ "Hot Country Singles chart for December 30, 1967". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2018.